Dr. Stephanie Steinmetz Pediatric Dentistry Vestavia Hills


Cleaning with Braces

It is VERY important to take extra care of your teeth

when you have braces, if not this can happen!


Flossing with Braces

 


Brushing with Braces

 



What are Sealants?

 

 

 Brushing and flossing are the best ways to help prevent cavities, but it’s not always easy to clean every nook and cranny of your teeth – especially those back teeth you use to chew (called molars). Molars are rough, uneven and a favorite place for leftover food and cavity-causing bacteria to hide. 

Still, there’s another safety net to help keep those teeth clean. It’s called a sealant, and it is a thin, protective coating that adheres to the chewing surface of your back teeth. They’re no substitute for brushing and flossing, but they can keep cavities from forming and may even stop early stages of decay from becoming a full-blown cavity. 

In fact, sealants have been shown to reduce the risk of decay by nearly 80% in molars. This is especially important when it comes to your child's dental health. In October 2016, the Centers for Disease Control released a report on the importance of sealants for school-aged children, of which only 43% of children ages 6-11 have. According to the CDC, "school-age children without sealants have almost three times more cavities than children with sealants."

 

How Do Sealants Work?

Think of them as raincoats for your teeth. When the cavity-causing bacteria that live in everyone’s mouth meet leftover food particles, they produce acids that can create holes in teeth. These holes are cavities. After sealant has been applied it keeps those bits of food out and stops bacteria and acid from settling on your teeth—just like a raincoat keeps you clean and dry during a storm.


Source for Sealant information: http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sealants





                                                        

 


 

© Images contained in this website are protected by copyright and may not be downloaded, republished, retransmitted, reproduced or otherwise used as a stand-alone file.